Joe Heap

Writer

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Photograph: Philippa Gedge

Books

Books

Joe Heap was born in 1986 to a biology teacher and a drama teacher, and grew up in a house that was 70% books, 25% bags of unmarked homework, 18% underpants drying on radiators, and 3% scattered Lego bricks.

He is very bad at maths.

In 2004 Joe won the Foyle Young Poet award, and his poetry has been published in several periodicals. He studied for a BA in English Literature at Stirling University and a Masters in Creative Writing at Glasgow University, during which time he ate a deep-fried Mars Bar. It was okay.

Joe is now a full-time writer, but previously worked as an editor of books for kids and young adults. He has also been a subtitler for BBC News, a face painter at a safari park and a removal man for a dental convention. Before smartphones were invented, he manned a text service where people could ‘ask any question’, but he has since forgotten most of the answers.

He lives in London with his long-suffering girlfriend, short-suffering son, and much-aggrieved tabby cat.

Current Publication:

THE RULES OF SEEING - HarperCollins - 9th August 2018

What you see depends on what you’re looking for…

RULE OF SEEING NO.399

Learning to see is often a thankless task. Then, sometimes, the world opens up and you understand nothing will ever look the same again.

Nova can do many things. She can speak five language. She can tell when someone is lying from the sound of their voice. She can even make an excellent sandwich with peaches, pepperoni and pickles…although she can’t convince anyone to try it.

But there’s one thing Nova can’t do. She can’t see. Until an operation restores her sight, and everything changes.

Nova meets Kate when both women need each other the most. And, as Kate comes into focus, Nova learns that the world isn’t as bright as she first thought it would be. She can sense that Kate’s problems are the ones you can’t see, and from an unspoken connection, an unlikely friendship blossoms.

It’s time for Nova to open her eyes and see the world differently, in the very best way.

Praise for THE RULES OF SEEING:

'An astonishing debut' Ruth Hogan, bestselling author of The Keeper Of Lost Things

'This has made me see the world in a different way, I loved it' Dawn O'Porter, author of The Cows

‘A quirky love story which promises to make you see the world in a completely new way’ Daily Mail

‘Joe Heap’s debut novel is a tender, tense drama about love and the unexpected places you can find it’ Sunday Express

‘Joe Heap’s fascinating debut makes you think about the things most of us take for granted’ Good Housekeeping

‘A fascinating exploration of how and what we see and what we choose not to' Red magazine

'This strikingly brilliant debut novel will truly open your eyes and make you see the world differently’ Fabulous magazine, the Sun

‘An inspiring story of love, loss and friendship’ #1 bestselling author Catherine Alliott

‘It really made me re-evaluate how I see the world…outstanding’ Katy Regan, author of Big Little Man

‘A book that reveals the world in a different light and changes the way you see it…Extraordinary’ Sunday Times bestseller Miranda Dickinson

‘Startlingly, outstandingly good’ Benjamin Ludwig, author of Ginny Moon

Fiction

Publication DetailsNotes
2018

HarperCollins

What you see depends on what you’re looking for…

RULE OF SEEING NO.399

Learning to see is often a thankless task. Then, sometimes, the world opens up and you understand nothing will ever look the same again.

Nova can do many things. She can speak five language. She can tell when someone is lying from the sound of their voice. She can even make an excellent sandwich with peaches, pepperoni and pickles…although she can’t convince anyone to try it.

But there’s one thing Nova can’t do. She can’t see. Until an operation restores her sight, and everything changes.

Nova meets Kate when both women need each other the most. And, as Kate comes into focus, Nova learns that the world isn’t as bright as she first thought it would be. She can sense that Kate’s problems are the ones you can’t see, and from an unspoken connection, an unlikely friendship blossoms.

It’s time for Nova to open her eyes and see the world differently, in the very best way.