Ellen Robertson

Actor / Performer

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Comedy

Associate Agent: Isaac Storm

Acting

Associate Agent: Cat Palethorpe

Film, TV & Theatre

Associate Agent: Isaac Storm
Associate Agent: Cat Palethorpe

Voiceover

Associate Agent: Jennifer Karniely

Comedy

Ellen can currently be seen in the BBC pilot BRITNEY, alongside Charly Clive, an adaptation of their hit stage show. 

In early 2022, Ellen starred onstage in Mike Bartlett’s play, a one-woman-show called MRS DELGADO. 

Ellen Robertson played Poppy opposite Kaya Scodelario and Rufus Sewell in the hit BBC One Agatha Christie mini-series THE PALE HORSE, and has subsequently had roles in THE OUTLAWS, PLS LIKE, and IN MY SKIN, all for the BBC. 

 

Praise for Ellen in MRS DELGADO:

★★★★ “endless charisma… Robertson brings an entire street to life. The conjuring of these characters never feels virtuosic. Instead, it feels effortless” - The Guardian

★★★★ “Britney’s Ellen Robertson is terrific, bringing both women to life with marvellous clarity. She plays Helen as coiled, self-critical and anxious. Her Mrs Delgado, by contrast, is a treat – voice tanned to rawhide by fag smoke, hip cocked forward in the suggestion of something slinky, and eyebrow raised to skewer Helen’s fluttering entreatries like a butterfly on a pin.” - The Telegraph

“A dual triumph for Ellen Robertson… and her director, Clare Lizzimore” - British Theatre Guide

★★★★Ellen Robertson dazzles in Mike Bartlett’s topical and captivating one-woman show… Robertson’s narration is riveting from the start. In contrast to her jittery portrayal of Helen, as Mrs Delgado, she is measured and self-assured – yet still, she manages to retain a mystical storyteller status. Unafraid of silence, she holds our attention throughout.” - The Stage

“Ellen Robertson’s brilliant tour-de-force performance and Mike Bartlett’s eye for seemingly inconsequential detail in the bigger picture make this a riveting, funny, anxiously sad and thought-provoking evening” - The Fine Times Recorder 

 

Praise for the BRITNEY pilot:

“The first time a brain tumour has ever been funny: It was ferociously funny, heartbreaking, and honest, and it’s the kind of show that makes me glad BBC Three is returning to television in February – BRITNEY deserves to be seen by as many people as possible.” - The i

“Much has been written about the rise of “sadcoms” — comedies that aren’t actually very funny, being more about the reality of emotional pain. Think FLEABAG or AFTER LIFE. BRITNEY seemed more of a “joycom”, despite revealing a premise potentially as bleak as any weepie of the week. Quite an achievement, and not what you might expect from a brief pilot that started out like a kooky rom-com about girly BFFs. Cue hyperreal visual flourishes and a tone switching on a sixpence between goofy joy and a sense of dread — and suddenly it was over, having fully earned a burning itch to find out what happened next. All in 20 minutes flat, which is going some.” - The Times

“Turning a brain tumour diagnosis into the stuff of comedy is no mean feat.. It’s sharp, funny and understatedly inspiring but so far it's only a pilot. It surely deserves a full series.” - Metro

“The episode ends on a stark yet strangely feelgood cliffhanger. Will more episodes be made? Well, if the BBC doesn't pick this up for a series it's them that needs their heads examined.” - Beyond the Joke

“The script is awash with quirks that give the programme a distinctive, sparky atmosphere well matched to the pair’s friendship… Clive and Robertson’s performances and chemistry are as a natural as you could hope, and so utterly endearing, the viewer feels right there with them when the awful news come. But the warmth – and the silliness – gives hope that everything might be all right despite it all.  Yet, sadly, there isn’t a full series ready to binge, as this tender, witty pilot leaves you yearning to find out how the pair deal with the biggest of life’s issues through their love and humour.” - Chortle

SHOWREEL

Stage

ProductionCharacterDirectorCompany

Britney: The Show

Various

Emily Burns

Vault Festival 2017

Britney in 'John'

Various

Emily Burns

Edinburgh Fringe 2017

Britney: The Show

Various

Emily Burns

Edinburgh Fringe 2016

Footlights Spring Revue 2015: A Whole Lot of Bother

Various

Raphael Wakefield, Ellie Warr

The Cambridge Footlights

Footlights Pantomime 2014: The Emperor's New Clothes

Various

Kennedy Bloomer

The Cambridge Footlights

Acting

Ellen can currently be seen in the BBC pilot BRITNEY, alongside Charly Clive, an adaptation of their hit stage show. 

In early 2022, Ellen starred onstage in Mike Bartlett’s play, a one-woman-show called MRS DELGADO. 

Ellen Robertson played Poppy opposite Kaya Scodelario and Rufus Sewell in the hit BBC One Agatha Christie mini-series THE PALE HORSE, and has subsequently had roles in THE OUTLAWS, PLS LIKE, and IN MY SKIN, all for the BBC. 

She is currently developing projects with Drama Republic, Baby Cow and NBC Universal. 

Praise for Ellen in MRS DELGADO:

★★★★ “endless charisma… Robertson brings an entire street to life. The conjuring of these characters never feels virtuosic. Instead, it feels effortless” - The Guardian

★★★★ “Britney’s Ellen Robertson is terrific, bringing both women to life with marvellous clarity. She plays Helen as coiled, self-critical and anxious. Her Mrs Delgado, by contrast, is a treat – voice tanned to rawhide by fag smoke, hip cocked forward in the suggestion of something slinky, and eyebrow raised to skewer Helen’s fluttering entreatries like a butterfly on a pin.” - The Telegraph

“A dual triumph for Ellen Robertson… and her director, Clare Lizzimore” - British Theatre Guide

★★★★ “Ellen Robertson dazzles in Mike Bartlett’s topical and captivating one-woman show… Robertson’s narration is riveting from the start. In contrast to her jittery portrayal of Helen, as Mrs Delgado, she is measured and self-assured – yet still, she manages to retain a mystical storyteller status. Unafraid of silence, she holds our attention throughout.” - The Stage

“Ellen Robertson’s brilliant tour-de-force performance and Mike Bartlett’s eye for seemingly inconsequential detail in the bigger picture make this a riveting, funny, anxiously sad and thought-provoking evening” - The Fine Times Recorder 

 

Praise for the BRITNEY pilot:

“The first time a brain tumour has ever been funny: It was ferociously funny, heartbreaking, and honest, and it’s the kind of show that makes me glad BBC Three is returning to television in February – BRITNEY deserves to be seen by as many people as possible.” - The i

“Much has been written about the rise of “sadcoms” — comedies that aren’t actually very funny, being more about the reality of emotional pain. Think FLEABAG or AFTER LIFE. BRITNEY seemed more of a “joycom”, despite revealing a premise potentially as bleak as any weepie of the week. Quite an achievement, and not what you might expect from a brief pilot that started out like a kooky rom-com about girly BFFs. Cue hyperreal visual flourishes and a tone switching on a sixpence between goofy joy and a sense of dread — and suddenly it was over, having fully earned a burning itch to find out what happened next. All in 20 minutes flat, which is going some.” - The Times

“Turning a brain tumour diagnosis into the stuff of comedy is no mean feat.. It’s sharp, funny and understatedly inspiring but so far it's only a pilot. It surely deserves a full series.” - Metro

“The episode ends on a stark yet strangely feelgood cliffhanger. Will more episodes be made? Well, if the BBC doesn't pick this up for a series it's them that needs their heads examined.” - Beyond the Joke

“The script is awash with quirks that give the programme a distinctive, sparky atmosphere well matched to the pair’s friendship… Clive and Robertson’s performances and chemistry are as a natural as you could hope, and so utterly endearing, the viewer feels right there with them when the awful news come. But the warmth – and the silliness – gives hope that everything might be all right despite it all.  Yet, sadly, there isn’t a full series ready to binge, as this tender, witty pilot leaves you yearning to find out how the pair deal with the biggest of life’s issues through their love and humour.” - Chortle

SHOWREEL

Film

ProductionCharacterDirectorCompany

MY FIRST DICK (Short)

Sherri Matthews

Kate McCoid

Television

ProductionCharacterDirectorCompany

CUCKOO

Emma

Various

Netflix

THE OFFENDERS

Rentagob

Various

Amazon Studios

JAZZ EMU

Ulla

Blink Industries

THE OUTLAWS S2

Rentagob

Stephen Merchant

Big Talk

THE OUTLAWS

Rentagob

Stephen Merchant

Big Talk

BRITNEY (Pilot)

Self

Luke Snellin

BBC Three

PLS LIKE S3

Freya

Baby Cow

THE PALE HORSE

Poppy

Leonora Lonsdale

Mammoth Screen,

IN MY SKIN

Jodie

Lucy Forbes

Expectation Entertainment

Stage

ProductionCharacterDirectorCompany

MRS DELGADO

Narrator

Clare Lizzimore

AN INTERVENTION

Actor

Clare Lizzimore

Old Fire Station

SNOWFLAKE

Maya

Clare Lizzimore

The Kiln Theatre

Snowflake

Maya

Clare Lizzimore

Arts at the Old Fire Station

Britney: The Show

Various

Emily Burns

Battersea Arts Centre

Britney: The Show

Various

Emily Burns

Vault Festival 2017

Britney in 'John'

Various

Emily Burns

Edinburgh Fringe 2017

Britney: The Show

Various

Emily Burns

Edinburgh Fringe 2016

Workshop

ProductionCharacterDirectorCompany

ALL SAINTS DAY

Sameena Hussain

English Touring Theatre

WENDY AND PETER PAN

Wendy

Jonathan Munby

Film, TV & Theatre

Ellen can currently be seen in the BBC pilot BRITNEY, alongside Charly Clive, an adaptation of their hit stage show. 

In early 2022, Ellen starred onstage in Mike Bartlett’s play, a one-woman-show called MRS DELGADO. 

Ellen Robertson played Poppy opposite Kaya Scodelario and Rufus Sewell in the hit BBC One Agatha Christie mini-series THE PALE HORSE, and has subsequently had roles in THE OUTLAWS, PLS LIKE, and IN MY SKIN, all for the BBC. 

She is currently developing projects with Drama Republic, Baby Cow and NBC Universal. 

 

Praise for Ellen in MRS DELGADO:

★★★★ “endless charisma… Robertson brings an entire street to life. The conjuring of these characters never feels virtuosic. Instead, it feels effortless” - The Guardian

★★★★ “Britney’s Ellen Robertson is terrific, bringing both women to life with marvellous clarity. She plays Helen as coiled, self-critical and anxious. Her Mrs Delgado, by contrast, is a treat – voice tanned to rawhide by fag smoke, hip cocked forward in the suggestion of something slinky, and eyebrow raised to skewer Helen’s fluttering entreatries like a butterfly on a pin.” - The Telegraph

“A dual triumph for Ellen Robertson… and her director, Clare Lizzimore” - British Theatre Guide

★★★★ “Ellen Robertson dazzles in Mike Bartlett’s topical and captivating one-woman show… Robertson’s narration is riveting from the start. In contrast to her jittery portrayal of Helen, as Mrs Delgado, she is measured and self-assured – yet still, she manages to retain a mystical storyteller status. Unafraid of silence, she holds our attention throughout.” - The Stage

“Ellen Robertson’s brilliant tour-de-force performance and Mike Bartlett’s eye for seemingly inconsequential detail in the bigger picture make this a riveting, funny, anxiously sad and thought-provoking evening” - The Fine Times Recorder 

She is currently developing projects with Drama Republic, Baby Cow and NBC Universal. 

 

Praise for the BRITNEY pilot:

“The first time a brain tumour has ever been funny: It was ferociously funny, heartbreaking, and honest, and it’s the kind of show that makes me glad BBC Three is returning to television in February – BRITNEY deserves to be seen by as many people as possible.” - The i

“Much has been written about the rise of “sadcoms” — comedies that aren’t actually very funny, being more about the reality of emotional pain. Think FLEABAG or AFTER LIFE. BRITNEY seemed more of a “joycom”, despite revealing a premise potentially as bleak as any weepie of the week. Quite an achievement, and not what you might expect from a brief pilot that started out like a kooky rom-com about girly BFFs. Cue hyperreal visual flourishes and a tone switching on a sixpence between goofy joy and a sense of dread — and suddenly it was over, having fully earned a burning itch to find out what happened next. All in 20 minutes flat, which is going some.” - The Times

“Turning a brain tumour diagnosis into the stuff of comedy is no mean feat.. It’s sharp, funny and understatedly inspiring but so far it's only a pilot. It surely deserves a full series.” - Metro

“The episode ends on a stark yet strangely feelgood cliffhanger. Will more episodes be made? Well, if the BBC doesn't pick this up for a series it's them that needs their heads examined.” - Beyond the Joke

“The script is awash with quirks that give the programme a distinctive, sparky atmosphere well matched to the pair’s friendship… Clive and Robertson’s performances and chemistry are as a natural as you could hope, and so utterly endearing, the viewer feels right there with them when the awful news come. But the warmth – and the silliness – gives hope that everything might be all right despite it all.  Yet, sadly, there isn’t a full series ready to binge, as this tender, witty pilot leaves you yearning to find out how the pair deal with the biggest of life’s issues through their love and humour.” - Chortle

SHOWREEL

Theatre

ProductionCompanyNotes

Nesting

2018

The Watermill

As Writer