The Estate of Angela Lambert

Writer

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Books

Agent: Caradoc King
Associate: Millie Hoskins
Assistant: Kat Aitken

Books

Angela Lambert was a television reporter for sixteen years, first on ‘News at Ten’ and then with London Weekend Television and Thames Television. For several years she was a writer for The Independent and, more recently, The Daily Mail. Her first book, UNQUIET SOULS, was runner-up for the Whitbread Prize for Biography in 1984. She was also the author of 1939: THE LAST SEASON OF PEACE. She had five novels published: LOVE AMONG THE SINGLE CLASSES; NO TALKING AFTER LIGHTS; A RATHER ENGLISH MARRIAGE; THE CONSTANT MISTRESS; and KISS AND KIN. Her latest novel, THE PROPERTY OF RAIN (Bantam Press), was published in 2001, and the biography THE LOST LIFE OF EVA BRAUN was published by Century in 2006.

Angela Lambert died on September 26 2007.

Fiction

Publication DetailsNotes

THE PROPERTY OF RAIN

2002

UK: Bantam

Sam Savage and Jake Roberts are born rivals. They grow up in the same Suffolk village during the 1920s. They join the army and are both posted to India. Playground rivalry turns into bitter enmity when Lakshimi, a young outcast girl, is brutally raped at the army camp in Cawnpore. The secrecy and hatred caused by the incident re-emerges with devastating effect in Suffolk in the 1950s, when Savage and Roberts are middle-aged men with families. Darker and more atmospheric than her earlier fiction, Angela Lambert’s new novel is a haunting story of revenge and redemption.

Non-Fiction

Publication DetailsNotes

THE LOST LIFE OF EVA BRAUN: A BIOGRAPHY

2007

UK: Century; US: St Martin's Press; Croatian: Naklada Ljevak (reverted); Czech: Prah; Danish (reverted): JP Books; Dutch: De Bez

For thirteen years Adolf Hitler’s mistress and for their last twenty-four hours his wife, Eva Braun is probably the most notorious nonentity in history. In this first full biography, novelist and journalist Angela Lambert, whose German mother was a close contemporary of Eva, draws on exclusive family material as well as extensive unpublished archives from Germany and the United States, to portray both the public and inner life of Hitler’s mistress - ‘on the face of it a simple Munich girl’ according to Albert Speer, ‘a nobody and yet…a most remarkable woman.’