Deborah Bull

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Books

Agent: Rosemary Scoular
Assistant: Natalia Lucas

Presenting

Agent: Rosemary Scoular
Assistant: Natalia Lucas

Books

Deborah Bull has had a long and successful career in the arts, as performer, creative leader and cultural commentator. She made her debut on stage at the age of four, joined The Royal Ballet School aged eleven and graduated into the company in 1981. Over twenty years she danced roles across The Royal Ballet’s repertoire, earning promotion to Principal in 1992. She was particularly noted for her performances in the works of William Forsythe, including Steptext, which won her an Olivier Award nomination. Following her performing career, she joined the Royal Opera House executive to devise and implement strategies for developing new art, new artists and new audiences, including its innovative ROH2 programme. She became Creative Director in 2008, taking executive responsibility for ROH Collections and leading on the organisation’s Olympic programming as well as its live relays to Big Screens nationwide.

She joined King's College London in 2012 to lead on the university's collaborations with artists and cultural organisations, establishing an innovative cultural engagement programme that has marked King's out as a global leader. As Vice President & Vice Principal (London) at King's College London, Deborah continues to provide high level leadership for culture, but has leadership responsibility for the university's relationships across London, maximising the potential of the university’s location in the heart of the capital to create new opportunities for staff, students and alumni, while meeting the needs of London and Londoners.

 

Non-Fiction

Publication DetailsNotes
2011

Faber

Through this vivid portrait of a dancer's every day, Deborah Bull reveals the arc of a dancer's life: from the seven-year-old's very first ballet class, through training, to company life, up through the ranks from corps de ballet to principal and then, not thirty years after it all began, to retirement and the inevitable sense of loss that comes with saying goodbye to your childhood dreams.

Other

Publication DetailsNotes

TITLE: THE POCKET GUIDE TO BALLET (co-author with Luke Jennings)

2004

faber

Extract...
The essential, easy-to-use classical ballet guide - spanning nearly two centuries of classical dance - with entries for more than eighty works from ballet companies around the world.

TITLE: dancing away

1998

methuen

Extract...
The personal journal of Deborah Bull, a principal dancer with the Royal Ballet, written during the year of Covent Garden's closure, as she and the company "danced away" on world tours.

TITLE: the vitality plan

1998

dorling

Extract...
Lose weight, tone your body and boost your zest for life with this practical programme which demonstrates how the only way to lose weight permanently is to combine a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet with the right type of exercise.

Presenting

Deborah Bull is best known as a dancer, writer and television personality who regularly writes and presents on dance for the BBC, including the award winning series, The Dancer’s Body. For Christmas 1998, she presented BBC2’s first ever Dance Night with the comedian Alexei Sayle; her four part BBC2 series, Travels with my Tutu, won record audiences for dance in December 2000; her landmark series The Dancer’s Body won the Overall Dance Screen Award at Monaco, 2002; and she presented Saved for the Nation, a ten part series on the National Art Collection for Sky Arts.  She has presented live performance on BBC 1, 2 and 4 from the Royal Opera House, the Proms and Sadler’s Wells, continues to present live 'in conversations' from the Edinburgh Festival each year and regularly appears as a cultural commentator on radio and television. Her numerous programmes for BBC Radio 3 and 4 cover topics as diverse as dance, the law and ageing. She writes on the arts across a range of media and is author of The Vitality Plan (1998), Dancing Away (1998), The Faber Pocket Guide to Ballet (2005) and The Everyday Dancer (2011). 

Deborah Bull has had a long and successful career in the arts, as performer, creative leader and cultural commentator. She made her debut on stage at the age of four, joined The Royal Ballet School aged eleven and graduated into the company in 1981. Over twenty years she danced roles across The Royal Ballet’s repertoire, earning promotion to Principal in 1992. She was particularly noted for her performances in the works of William Forsythe, including Steptext, which won her an Olivier Award nomination. In 1996, her much publicized address at the Oxford Union catapulted her into the political arena of the arts world and she joined the Royal Opera House Executive in 2001 to establish and implement strategies for developing new art, new artists and new audiences, becoming Creative Director in 2008. She has served on Arts Council England, as a Governor of the BBC and the South Bank Centre, and she was a judge for the 2010 Man Booker Prize. In 1999 she was awarded a CBE for her contribution to the arts. As Assistant Principal (Culture & Engagement), King's College London, Deborah provides leadership across the university to extend and enrich its collaborative activities with the cultural sector; and leads on development of the university's external engagement profile within London, maximising the potential of King’s location in the heart of the city. 

Deborah joined King's College London in 2012 to lead on the university's collaborations with artists and cultural organisations, establishing an innovative cultural engagement programme that has marked King's out as a global leader. As Vice President & Vice Principal (London) at King's College London, Deborah continues to provide high level leadership for culture, but has leadership responsibility for the university's relationships across London, maximising the potential of the university’s location in the heart of the capital to create new opportunities for staff, students and alumni, while meeting the needs of London and Londoners.

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